Archive for the ‘Product Reviews’ Category

Hi folks!

Any of you just have your $300 composite hockey stick snap shortly after your warranty also expired? Well, this blog post may be for you. Check out what Integral Hockey can do for you and your stick budget.

-Dave

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Aerospace Technology Takes Composite Stick Repair To New Level 

New Development In Composite Repair Process Saving Teams, Players, & Parents $$$

Canadian business owner, and founder of Integral Hockey Inc., Randy Langille, of Port Alberni, BC, has developed a process in composite hockey stick repair that is quickly becoming the leading-edge repair system in the industry. Since the arrival of composite repair services, stick owners have had to make do when sending their broken sticks in for repair, namely, dealing with substantial loss of flexibility in their sticks – typically affecting several inches on either side of the break, along with a considerable increase in weight. The Integral Hockey repair process involves taking these broken sticks and repairing them applying true composite aerospace technology with the end result – no noticeable change in respect to weight, flex, kick-point and balance. Junior A, Junior B, Triple A Midget and Bantam teams, along with minor, as well as, rec-league players, are reporting no compromise in the dynamics of their repaired sticks, in addition to experiencing the cost-savings benefits. Further details along with testimonials and video clips on the performance of an Integral Hockey stick repair, may be found at the following lnk: http://www.integralhockey.com/media

Integral Hockey’s goal (pun intended), is to provide everyone involved within the dynamic hockey community, whether it be teams, players, parents, etc., from a local to eventual, international level, not only a trusted source in affordable composite stick repair, but in addition, offer superior quality and workmanship utilizing composite aerospace technology. In Langille’s own words, “We have taken a very real problem, solved it with the most high-tech solution on the market, and we’re delivering it at a price that will work for everyone. Something we are very proud of.”

In addition, Integral Hockey is doing their part in promoting a ‘Green’ agenda. They’ve implemented a system taking broken sticks that are beyond repair, and sending them to be ground into carbon fiber powder which can then be reused to manufacture other products, thereby reducing the carbon footprint from these composite sticks that typically end up in a land-fill. Integral Hockey considers themselves to be ‘the ultimate Canadian recycling business’.

Integral Hockey is the brainchild of former aircraft component manufacturer, Randy Langille. Having tested and refined repair techniques for several years during the early days of his manufacturing career, his desire was to use his skills to develop a process that would revolutionize the hockey stick repair industry. Hence, Integral Hockey was born. And, due to the tremendous response the company has already received in the short time since its inception, repair service locations along with franchise opportunities, are now available, Canada-wide.

For general information, or to contact Integral Hockey regarding repair locations in your area, please visit http://www.integralhockey.com. For inquiries on franchise opportunities, contact Gord Piercey at, gord@integralhockey.com, or call 250-710-5895.

Hi folks!
I was recently sent a product to review from the fine folks at SPATS — they make hockey skate foot shields to prevent injuries to players’ feet. As a former shot-blocking winger that was lucky to escape without any foot injuries, I wish these were available to me when I was playing hockey at a level where blocking shots was worth the bodily sacrifice and injury potential.
After installing them, and trying them out for a couple of games, here’s what I thought:
1. Installation — The process to install these onto your skates is moderately labor intense. You have to unlace your skates (if you have old laces with frayed ends that won’t fit back through the eyelets, you may want to pick up a new pair of laces), and then re-lace them through the plastic attachment. This moves two of your skate’s lace points closer to the middle, but did not seem to affect the tightness of my skate. You also have to nut and bolt the shield into your original eyelets — if you’re not all that handy with two screwdrivers at once, you may need an assistant. After that, all you have to do is stick the velcro piece on the bottom of your skate for the shield to clasp onto and lock. Once installed, the shields then easily open and close for skate tightening and loosening.
2. Game Play — My fear was these shields were somehow going to affect my stride, or my ankle flexion and extension. In all honestly, they did not in any way. I skated just the same as I did without them. I didn’t notice them to be a distraction in any matter. I barely noticed them at all, in fact.
3. Injury Prevention — Fortunately (I guess unfortunately, for the sake of testing), I did not receive any direct blows to my feet — that I was aware of. I can’t say definitively whether they prevented a foot injury for me, but as they say, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”, right?
4. Aesthetics — Let’s be honest, many hockey players are concerned for their style on the ice, and how an supplemental additive outside of the standard 8 pieces of hockey equipment all  players wear like this will alter their look. The pair I demo’ed was clear, and were barely noticeable, visually. Other players noticed I had them on, and asked about them, so it’s not like they’re invisible. Personally, I wouldn’t choose to put on a colored pair, but they are available, and teams looking to match can take adavantage of that.
5. Price — SPATS are sold for $50.
All in all, this is a solid product. Its advantages far outweigh its disadvantages. Any hockey players looking to prevent future potential foot injuries, or any players who have suffered them in the past, and are looking for a way to beef up their foot protection would be smart to pick themselves up a pair of these.
Read below for some further reading on SPATS and foot injuries and hockey. Also, check out their website http://www.spats.ca/  , “Like” their Facebook page and follow them on Twitter .
-Dave
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Spats.ca is trying to prevent foot injuries and spread awareness by attaching a feather light guard directly over the skate laces. Spats are a revolutionary piece of ice hockey gear designed to stop foot injury. This lightweight armour attaches easily to the skate and allows for quick access to the laces. The high density polyethylene shield can absorb any impact directed at the laces or the inside of the skate boot. In a game where pucks can easily be moving upwards of 80 mph (108.8 if you’re in front of Zdeno Chara’s cannon fire), foot injuries are common.  The art of blocking shots is being taught at all levels. Spats will give you the confidence to make that game saving block.
Every year teams lose the services of players due to foot injuries, injuries that are now largely preventable. Many of today’s foot injuries in hockey could have been prevented with skate protectors. A recent list of NHL players missing games due to foot injuries includes:
James Neal – Pittsburgh Penguins (out for a number of weeks)
Devante Smith-Pelly – Anaheim Ducks (out 4-6 weeks)
Ville Leino – Buffalo Sabres (Missed a month)
Jay Pandolfo – New York Islanders (Missed 17 games)
Richard Park – Pittsburgh Penguins (Missed five weeks)
Colby Armstrong – Toronto Maple Leafs (Missed 23 games)
Bryan Little – Winnipeg Jets (Missed eight games)
Jeff Carter – Columbus Blue Jackets
Chris Pronger – Philadelphia Flyers

Hockey Foot Injury Statistics:
  •     95% of hockey players have had an injury to their foot from a shot or a slash.
  •     78% of players who reported a foot injury experienced bruising and 15% suffered a fracture.
  •     23% who have had a foot injury have missed one or more weeks due to their injury.

Injuries to the foot during hockey are often long standing with symptoms years after,” says Dr. Michael Ball, a leading Manitoban podiatrist. “In my practice, many of my patients who sustained injuries to the feet as children or young adults still complain of symptoms from these injuries to different degrees later in life. Unlike a fracture of the arm, you place two-and-a-half times your weight on your feet to walk and skate. I think that in order to prevent long term problems, any protection from injuries is very important.”

You wouldn’t go on the ice without protecting your shin bone, so why do we play with the bones in our feet exposed?” says Lawrence Parrott, the inventor of Spats Skate Armour.